Tag: babybirds

Photography Challenge Day 84: The Mallard Family

So on my walk today around Boomer Lake, I noticed that it isn’t just the geese that have already hatched a brood this year–there is a small number of baby mallards on the lake now as well.

The mallard family swimming on the lake.

I came across this family starting to swim out into the lake, shortly after seeing a great blue heron catch it’s morning snack.

So some facts about how mallards nest and raise their young:

Usually the female will form a shallow depression/hole in moist areas (that are usually close to the water), and as she is doing that she is pulling vegetation towards her. So in other words—she makes a nest in a area that provides ample protection and material to line her nest.

She will lay anywhere from five to fifteen eggs (with the average being seven to ten), and the incubation time is anywhere from twenty-three to thirty days (so basically three to four weeks). The young are able to leave the nest within a day after hatching. They stay with their parents (mainly the mother), and are able to fly within fifty-two to sixty days after hatching. Mallards usually have just one brood a year (as it is basically three months from egg laying to the time the ducklings are able to fly), though if they have the first one early enough in the year—they might have a second one mid to late summer.

References: https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/mallard; https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Mallard/lifehistory

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Photography Challenge Day 63: The Canada Goose “family”

Well at least one pair of geese at the lake have had an successful first brood of the season.

The Canada geese and their offspring swimming on the lake.

So one can now officially declare it spring going into summer–I spotted the first goslings of the year. It’s a little early (since we still have a little over a week left in April), but there are five to six little Canada geese swimming between their parents. I even saw the front parent turn to run off another goose that was following them (and the goslings were like “oh, we need to turn okay…”).

The goslings following one parent, while the other is trying to get them to turn around again.

Now through August/September the population of the geese at Boomer Lake will continue to increase, though by fall quite a few will be caught and transferred to other areas of the state. The hopes will be that the population will be thinned enough for the lake to support the ones that weren’t transferred and any migratory birds that come through as well.

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