Tag: cottontailrabbit

Photography Challenge Day 137: the dragonfly and the rabbit

Well there was a draw when trying to decide the winner of today’s photography challenge–therefore there will be two today.

I decided to go ahead and do a morning walk (as I wasn’t sure of how congested the pedestrian traffic was going to be at the lake this morning). I’ve realized that depending on what time I walk, determines what wildlife I may see on my walk.

Since I’ve been trying to do early (though not super early) walks due to the weather I haven’t seen that many turtles out and about. I also haven’t seen that many different species of birds. I have been trying to keep my eye out for other wildlife (such as turtles, dragonflies, rabbits, and so forth).

Today I was lucky to be able to get the picture of the following dragonfly and then one of the many rabbits that are living up at the lake.

Dragonfly resting on a blade of grass

I’m not sure what type of dragonfly this is, but it is a beautiful one (even if I got the picture of the back end). Since I’ve decided to do more than just bird watch at the lake, I’ve been able to get pictures of animals that I normally would pass by, but they turn out to be wonderful photography subjects.

Then a little later on my walk I noticed that there was a cottontail rabbit out grazing in the grass.

Cottontail rabbit having its breakfast

I just didn’t think that I’d actually capture a picture of one with a mouthful of grass. I’ve noticed on my walk that there are at least four to six rabbits up at the lake, and they all look to be fairly large, so they’re probably all adults (how old–that I don’t know).

That means there is a healthy rabbit population at the lake, and also a healthy predator population as well. I know through reading up on cottontail rabbits, they have several litters of young a year because most don’t survive–so with seeing the number I have, it means that next spring I should probably still be seeing at least four rabbits around the lake.

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Photography challenge day 121 (Short Post and a day late): A rabbit chilling out

The winner of today’s photograph challenge is the rabbit that was chilling out at Boomer Lake the other morning.

A rabbit munching on some grass

So when I was on my walk at Boomer, I noticed that there was a rabbit that was just almost sunning itself, though it was attuned to it’s environment.

This rabbit was enjoying some moist greens as we had just had a rainstorm earlier in the morning.

It’s eating its greens….

I’ve seen at least three (and I’m pretty sure they’re three different ones) rabbits up around Boomer Lake, and walking to the bus stop I’ve seen at least one in the wooded area by the bus stop. While rabbits can have numerous litters, many of the young don’t survive the first year–which is one reason why they aren’t overrunning the neighborhoods. It is nice to see them every so often–they’re an essential part of the ecosystem.

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Cottontails are out and about: photography challenge day 60

So today’s photograph is of a cottontail rabbit (Sylvilagus floridanus). Seeing these guys in the morning now means that spring is here and summer is around the corner. I will now hopefully be seeing this one (or another) at least two to three days a week as I walk to catch the morning bus.

I spied a cottontail rabbit on my way to the bus stop this morning.

So what are some facts about the cottontail rabbit?

The eastern cottontail rabbit is the most common species of cottontail rabbits and is found throughout North and South America (though within the US—it’s found from the east coast to the great plains—hence the name eastern cottontail).

They like to be on the edge of open areas—so they can be found at the edge of fields, farms, meadows, parks—areas that can also back up to wooded areas to hide.

They’re herbivores—so they eat grasses and if they can get into gardens—they’ll munch on peas, lettuce, and herbs. During the winter months they’ll eat bark, twigs, and buds.

Rabbits tend to breed three to four times a year (as only about fifteen percent of the young survive their first year), and the young are self-sufficient within a month (which is about one to two months before they reach sexual maturity). The populations of cottontails can grow quite quickly depending on the number of initial rabbits in the area.

References:
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/e/eastern-cottontail-rabbit/

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