Tag: lifestylechallenge

Book Review, and yes I think I need to reboot my life

So one of the books that I’ve finished reading this month is “Reboot your life: Energize your career and life by taking a break” by Catherine Allen, Nancy Bearg, Rita Foley, & Jaye Smith. I actually bought this book sometime last year (I think because the title of the book grabbed my attention), but I actually sat down and read it over the past few weeks.

I’m starting to think that once we start listening and trying to tune into the flow of the universe, little things start to happen for a reason (picking up the book last year, but actually sitting down to read it this year). This is one book that I will be going back to over the years, as I take reboot breaks as needed.

The authors call these breaks, reboot breaks but they can also be referred to as gap months (or gap year) or a sabbatical. During the time I read the book, I’ve realized that since earning my PhD back in 2010 there have only been about eight and a half months (in total) that I wasn’t working. But I also realized that I never really spent a large amount of time during those times to try to figure out what I wanted to do with my life. I’d started to do that a little with the last “break”, but was also still caught up in the “need a job/need to earn money/need to get off unemployment” mindset.

The authors walk you through the steps that are necessary for planning and taking a reboot break in one’s life—and with the way society is going, we all need to unplug and reboot to make sure that we are actually doing what makes us happy and not just what is earning us a paycheck.

The book talks about everything from planning your reboot break, to how to fund it, talking with others about your break (current employer, family, friends, and others), and what they consider the different stages of the reboot break; as well as a few other things. I also didn’t realize how many different companies were actually on board with their employees doing a reboot break (and some of them might even still pay you while you’re “rebooting” your life).

I’ve realized over the past few weeks that I probably really need to do a reboot break—I’m not happy in my current position (it’s a dead end position, limited pay raises, and slightly limited opportunities for personal/professional development. Noticed I said limited—there are opportunities, but one has to make sure that they don’t take away from the main job—which may mean having to do “overtime” but without the benefit of earning the overtime pay).

Job searching is difficult right now, when I’m still undecided on the path(s) I should be investigating. Also I’ve realized it’s hard to search, when I feel like I’m living in a fog—therefore I also need to be focusing on my physical and mental health as well.

One thing the book does try to stress is that one should try to plan out their reboot break about a year in advance (though they claim that you can condense the timescale if you need to). If I decide to do a reboot break, I’d be doing it in roughly seven to eight months (more or less when my current contract is up), though I’ve also thought of possibly trying to find a part-time job during the holidays for money and then starting my reboot break at the start of the new year.  So far I’ve only gotten as far as acknowledging the fact that I need to take a reboot break—how long it will be, or when I still haven’t decided—but the break will happen within the next eighteen months.

I strongly recommend this book for anyone who is burnt out, beginning to burnout, or ones who have no idea of what they actually want to do in life. I wish I’d found this book sooner (or actually read it when I originally bought it), that way I possibly could have already done a reboot break and have figured out part of my life.

I will keep you posted on how my reboot journey goes (from the planning, to execution of the break, to then finding the type of industry position that I really want) over the next (let’s say) eighteen to twenty-four months.

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One month into the 333 clothing challenge

So I’m trying to do the 333-project for April through June, and I’ve realized a couple of things so far:

I currently have over forty short-sleeve and sleeveless shirts. I also can’t totally put away the longer sleeve shirts, as there are still some cool days (though I could just wear a sweatshirt hoodie over a short-sleeve shirt), and I also don’t have enough hangers for my clothes. This is the one that is irritating—I actually bought a set of hangers last year, and it was a batch of 50 hangers, and I’ve taken a couple from my parents closet and that is in addition to the two dozen or so other hangers I have. Takeaway—I have too many shirts (since I’m not even counting the sweaters that I put into the dresser drawers or the clothes that I have in my storage unit).

I do cycle through the t-shirts, though I wear some of them more often than others. So far it hasn’t gotten warm enough to move to the totally sleeveless shirts (which I will probably do during summer (with a light jacket left at work for those chilly days). I’m finding this slightly funny to realize that I have a lot of clothes, as I’ve never considered myself a fashion person—I buy what I want, and I wear what I want. I just never really noticed how often I’d buy something that I would only wear maybe three or four times before it got lost in the closet.

I’ve also realized that since I’ve gained weight back after the purchase of certain shirts—they don’t fit as nicely as they once did. This means that I should probably spend an evening (or morning) trying on all my shirts and any that I don’t like the look and feel of—I donate or try to sell. I’ve realized that once I lose weight again—I can buy new shirts to replace the ones that will become hopefully too baggy to wear. But wearing shirts that aren’t comfortable isn’t doing much for my mental health either. Therefore hopefully by mid-May I can get the number of t-shirts down from over forty to hopefully twenty-five (a decrease of at least fifteen t-shirts).

The major goal of this challenge is to downsize the amount of clothes that I own to a degree (there are still the clothes in storage—which are being used as packing material and therefore I have to wait until I move to be able to go through those).

So the goal for the coming weekend is to go through my shirts and try on each and every one—and the ones that I don’t like how they fit, put them in a box to either donate or to sell and make a little bit of money.

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